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Berman, I. (2006). E-mail-“inspired” changes in non-native legal discourse. Language@Internet, 3, article 4. (urn:nbn:de:0009-7-3726)

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%0 Journal Article
%T E-mail-“inspired” changes in non-native legal discourse
%A Berman, Isabel
%J Language@Internet
%D 2006
%V 3
%N 4
%@ 1860-2029
%F berman2006
%X At IDC, students use electronic resources for research and online interactive communication with instructors, usually in English. This paper discusses preliminary research into the overlap between the informality of e-mail communication between students and instructors and the growing use (or misuse) of e-mail-type informal discourse in formal written legal assignments. Four students were given a hypothetical legal case and requested to write: (a) a formal letter that would be sent by e-mail to one of the parties in the case, and (b) an executive memo e-mail to the senior partner in one of the law firms representing the parties. No instruction was given as to constructing a formal legal letter or an executive memo. In the resulting e-mail communications, many examples of typical informal e-mail shorthand were used. The students were interviewed and were able to locate and change most of the errors in their letters. Several students expressed the belief that this type of “shorthand” is or should be acceptable when the formal message is an e-mail communication.
%L 400
%K informality of e-mail communication
%K non-native legal discourse
%K online interactive communication
%U http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-7-3726

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Bibtex

@Article{berman2006,
  author = 	"Berman, Isabel",
  title = 	"E-mail-``inspired'' changes in non-native legal discourse",
  journal = 	"Language@Internet",
  year = 	"2006",
  volume = 	"3",
  number = 	"4",
  keywords = 	"informality of e-mail communication; non-native legal discourse; online interactive communication",
  abstract = 	"At IDC, students use electronic resources for research and online interactive communication with instructors, usually in English. This paper discusses preliminary research into the overlap between the informality of e-mail communication between students and instructors and the growing use (or misuse) of e-mail-type informal discourse in formal written legal assignments. Four students were given a hypothetical legal case and requested to write: (a) a formal letter that would be sent by e-mail to one of the parties in the case, and (b) an executive memo e-mail to the senior partner in one of the law firms representing the parties. No instruction was given as to constructing a formal legal letter or an executive memo. In the resulting e-mail communications, many examples of typical informal e-mail shorthand were used. The students were interviewed and were able to locate and change most of the errors in their letters. Several students expressed the belief that this type of ``shorthand'' is or should be acceptable when the formal message is an e-mail communication.",
  issn = 	"1860-2029",
  url = 	"http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-7-3726"
}

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RIS

TY  - JOUR
AU  - Berman, Isabel
PY  - 2006
DA  - 2006//
TI  - E-mail-“inspired” changes in non-native legal discourse
JO  - Language@Internet
VL  - 3
IS  - 4
KW  - informality of e-mail communication
KW  - non-native legal discourse
KW  - online interactive communication
AB  - At IDC, students use electronic resources for research and online interactive communication with instructors, usually in English. This paper discusses preliminary research into the overlap between the informality of e-mail communication between students and instructors and the growing use (or misuse) of e-mail-type informal discourse in formal written legal assignments. Four students were given a hypothetical legal case and requested to write: (a) a formal letter that would be sent by e-mail to one of the parties in the case, and (b) an executive memo e-mail to the senior partner in one of the law firms representing the parties. No instruction was given as to constructing a formal legal letter or an executive memo. In the resulting e-mail communications, many examples of typical informal e-mail shorthand were used. The students were interviewed and were able to locate and change most of the errors in their letters. Several students expressed the belief that this type of “shorthand” is or should be acceptable when the formal message is an e-mail communication.
SN  - 1860-2029
UR  - http://nbn-resolving.de/urn:nbn:de:0009-7-3726
ID  - berman2006
ER  - 
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Wordbib

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<b:Comments>At IDC, students use electronic resources for research and online interactive communication with instructors, usually in English. This paper discusses preliminary research into the overlap between the informality of e-mail communication between students and instructors and the growing use (or misuse) of e-mail-type informal discourse in formal written legal assignments. Four students were given a hypothetical legal case and requested to write: (a) a formal letter that would be sent by e-mail to one of the parties in the case, and (b) an executive memo e-mail to the senior partner in one of the law firms representing the parties. No instruction was given as to constructing a formal legal letter or an executive memo. In the resulting e-mail communications, many examples of typical informal e-mail shorthand were used. The students were interviewed and were able to locate and change most of the errors in their letters. Several students expressed the belief that this type of “shorthand” is or should be acceptable when the formal message is an e-mail communication.</b:Comments>
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ISI

PT Journal
AU Berman, I
TI E-mail-“inspired” changes in non-native legal discourse
SO Language@Internet
PY 2006
VL 3
IS 4
DE informality of e-mail communication; non-native legal discourse; online interactive communication
AB At IDC, students use electronic resources for research and online interactive communication with instructors, usually in English. This paper discusses preliminary research into the overlap between the informality of e-mail communication between students and instructors and the growing use (or misuse) of e-mail-type informal discourse in formal written legal assignments. Four students were given a hypothetical legal case and requested to write: (a) a formal letter that would be sent by e-mail to one of the parties in the case, and (b) an executive memo e-mail to the senior partner in one of the law firms representing the parties. No instruction was given as to constructing a formal legal letter or an executive memo. In the resulting e-mail communications, many examples of typical informal e-mail shorthand were used. The students were interviewed and were able to locate and change most of the errors in their letters. Several students expressed the belief that this type of “shorthand” is or should be acceptable when the formal message is an e-mail communication.
ER

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Mods

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  <titleInfo>
    <title>E-mail-“inspired” changes in non-native legal discourse</title>
  </titleInfo>
  <name type="personal">
    <namePart type="family">Berman</namePart>
    <namePart type="given">Isabel</namePart>
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  <abstract>At IDC, students use electronic resources for research and online interactive communication with instructors, usually in English. This paper discusses preliminary research into the overlap between the informality of e-mail communication between students and instructors and the growing use (or misuse) of e-mail-type informal discourse in formal written legal assignments. Four students were given a hypothetical legal case and requested to write: (a) a formal letter that would be sent by e-mail to one of the parties in the case, and (b) an executive memo e-mail to the senior partner in one of the law firms representing the parties. No instruction was given as to constructing a formal legal letter or an executive memo. In the resulting e-mail communications, many examples of typical informal e-mail shorthand were used. The students were interviewed and were able to locate and change most of the errors in their letters. Several students expressed the belief that this type of “shorthand” is or should be acceptable when the formal message is an e-mail communication.</abstract>
  <subject>
    <topic>informality of e-mail communication</topic>
    <topic>non-native legal discourse</topic>
    <topic>online interactive communication</topic>
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